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Celery Juice for Psoriasis: Can It Really Help Your Skin?

Medically reviewed by Lisa Booth, RDN
Written by Torrey Kim
Posted on April 11, 2023

If you’re exploring natural treatments for psoriasis, you may have heard about celery juice. This drink is said to have many benefits for people with skin conditions, but it’s not clear whether research can back up the claims.

“I have heard many good things about celery juice,” one MyPsoriasisTeam member wrote. Another replied, “I’ve seen a lot of interesting information about it on the web.”

Keep reading to find out why there is so much hype around celery juice for psoriasis and if this refreshing drink can safely decrease symptoms.

Why All the Hype About Celery Juice and Psoriasis?

People likely had tried celery juice to treat psoriasis symptoms earlier, but the idea became popular in 2019, when self-described medical medium Anthony William proposed the juice as a remedy for a variety of conditions, including psoriasis. Other online personalities, such as Kim Kardashian, jumped on this claim train and promoted drinking celery juice for improving psoriasis symptoms.

The idea took hold, and more people began juicing celery stalks to see if drinking the beverage could improve their symptoms as well. Recommendations for how to consume it varied, but the most popular method was to drink a tall glass of celery juice on an empty stomach every morning to get the maximum benefit.

Can Celery Juice Help With Psoriasis?

So, does starting your day by sipping a glass of these greens really help? The National Psoriasis Foundation called the celery juice diet a fad, stating that there’s scant evidence to support the idea that consuming celery juice on an empty stomach — or any other way — can improve psoriasis symptoms.

Although the effects of celery juice on psoriasis haven’t been specifically investigated, some researchers have evaluated the beneficial properties of celery juice. One study found that certain compounds in celery have antioxidant qualities, which are properties that help prevent cell damage. However, the study authors noted that further research is needed to evaluate the potential healing properties of celery.

Another study found that celery leaves and stems had anti-inflammatory properties, suggesting they may be able to help reduce inflammation, which is thought to play a key role in psoriasis symptoms. However, these studies didn’t investigate the use of celery specifically for psoriasis or research the most beneficial approaches.

    There is no proven connection between celery and improvement in psoriasis symptoms at this point.

    What MyPsoriasisTeam Members Say About Celery Juice

    Despite the lack of definitive research on celery juice and psoriasis, some MyPsoriasisTeam members have tried drinking the beverage, reporting varying degrees of success.

    “I now have a large glass of pure celery juice in the morning on an empty stomach,” one member wrote. “It has truly worked wonders.” Another member said, “For the psoriasis, I drink straight celery juice in the morning a half hour before I eat breakfast. I just bought a $65 juicer, and it works like a charm! I buy organic celery at Whole Foods — it costs $1.99 a piece and works so well.”

    Other members have been skeptical about whether celery juice has any benefits. One wrote, “I tried it and it tasted awful. Didn’t help my plaques at all.” Another member said, “It’s supposed to help with internal inflammation. How would I know if it was working?”

    How To Safely Use Celery Juice for Psoriasis

    Although no data has been published to support the health benefits of celery juice for psoriasis, the National Psoriasis Foundation notes that there’s likely no harm in consuming the beverage, even if it doesn’t have an effect on your symptoms. But it’s important to follow a few key recommendations to ensure you stay on track with your psoriasis treatment plan.

    Talk to Your Dermatologist

    Before trying celery juice or any other natural remedy for psoriasis, get medical advice from your health care team to make sure that it’s safe and won’t interact with any of your medications. Let them know how much celery juice you plan to consume, what time of day you plan to drink it, and if you will use it topically. This information will give your dermatologist the full picture of how you plan to use the celery juice so they can make an informed decision about whether it’s a smart choice for you.

    Stick to Your Treatment Plan

    If you decide to add celery juice to your daily routine, make sure to continue your psoriasis treatment regimen. Sticking to your plan means continuing to take your prescription medications, including topical creams, injections, or oral drugs, and avoiding any triggers you have identified that can cause your psoriasis to flare.

    Choose Real Celery Over Supplements

    Some people find juicing to be too time-consuming, so they turn to celery supplements instead. However, eating food in its natural form is the best way to get the most nutrients. When you eat the whole celery plant, you get extra fiber. Dietary fiber has been shown to help decrease inflammation, therefore helping psoriasis.

    There’s no evidence that vitamins or supplements can ease psoriasis symptoms. Plus, not all supplements are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), so you may not know what you’re actually taking when you consume them. Eating fresh celery is inexpensive, helps you fill up on nutrients without excess calories (if losing or maintaining weight is a goal for you), and adds a little crunch to your diet.

    Consider Your Daily Diet

    If you’re interested in adding celery to your diet but don’t want to drink celery juice every morning, consider meeting with a registered dietitian or nutritionist. They can help you choose a variety of fruits and vegetables that can contribute to your overall health and may improve your psoriasis symptoms. You might also consider changing your eating habits, with your medical provider’s approval.

    No specific diet has been shown to prevent, cure, or improve psoriasis symptoms. However, consuming ingredients associated with an anti-inflammatory diet, such as the Mediterranean diet or a plant-based diet, may be beneficial.

    In addition, some people find success with an elimination diet. This approach allows you to remove certain ingredients from your diet and record whether avoiding them has any effect on your symptoms. Be sure to get guidance from your doctor and dietitian to make sure you’re getting enough of the right nutrients when you consider cutting some foods out.

    Research indicates that certain foods, such as too much alcohol, sugar, or processed fats, can make your psoriasis symptoms worse. You may find that eliminating those items from your diet may bring symptom improvement.

    Although certain changes in your diet may help manage psoriasis symptoms, such as avoiding trigger foods, no specific food or drink has been proved to cure or effectively treat psoriasis. Deciding whether to try complementary or dietary therapies like celery juice is a personal choice, but it’s essential to always consult with a medical professional before you change your diet.

    Talk With Others Who Understand

    MyPsoriasisTeam is the social network for people with psoriasis and their loved ones. On MyPsoriasisTeam, more than 116,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with psoriasis.

    Have you tried drinking celery juice to help improve your psoriasis symptoms? Did it work for you? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on your Activities page.

    Posted on April 11, 2023
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    Lisa Booth, RDN studied foods and nutrition at San Diego State University, in California and obtained a registered dietitian nutritionist license in 2008. Learn more about her here.
    Torrey Kim is a freelance writer with MyHealthTeam. Learn more about her here.

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