4 Facts To Know About Psoriasis in Babies: Early Symptoms and Treatments | MyPsoriasisTeam

Connect with others who understand.

sign up Log in
Resources
About MyPsoriasisTeam
Powered By

4 Facts To Know About Psoriasis in Babies: Early Symptoms and Treatments

Medically reviewed by Florentina Negoi, M.D.
Updated on February 9, 2024

Many babies have sensitive skin and rashes that come and go. If you have a family history of psoriasis, you may start to wonder, “Can babies have psoriasis too?”

Though psoriasis is most common in teenagers and adults, one third of the people with the condition start showing symptoms during childhood. Moreover, psoriasis can affect children of all ages, including newborns and babies up to 2 years of age. “I’ve had psoriasis since I was an infant but never had it as bad as now,” shared a MyPsoriasisTeam member.

Psoriasis is a chronic condition that causes inflammation and the accelerated production of skin cells. Skin builds up more quickly than it can shed, causing patches of thickened, scaly skin that can crack, bleed, and itch.

Following are four facts to know about psoriasis in babies.

Psoriasis can affect infants and young children. Babies with a family history of psoriasis may be at greater risk of developing the skin condition. (Branisteanu et al./CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

1. Psoriasis Affects 1 Percent of Children

Psoriasis affects approximately 1 percent of children. According to a 2016 study of children with psoriasis, the most common types of psoriasis in babies and children are plaque psoriasis, guttate psoriasis, scalp psoriasis, and — more rarely — pustular or inverse psoriasis. Babies with a family history of psoriasis are more likely to have the disease. Psoriasis in babies may resolve during childhood or may continue on later in life.

Guttate psoriasis is the second most common type of psoriasis in children. This type of psoriasis is often triggered by a strep throat infection. (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 NZ/DermNet)

Pustular psoriasis only affects around 1 percent to 5 percent of children with psoriasis. It can sometimes be accompanied by a fever. (Branisteanu et al./CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

2. Babies Often Have Psoriasis Symptoms in the Diaper Area

In psoriasis, an overactive immune system response causes inflammation and a buildup of skin cells. These extra skin cells create plaques that are thick, discolored (generally red or purple, depending on skin color), itchy, and sometimes painful. The lesions in children are smaller and the formed scales are usually thinner. Psoriasis plaques are usually symmetrical. In children, symptoms frequently appear on the face. They also can cover large areas of the body.

Psoriasis plaques in babies are commonly seen in the diaper area. These plaques are also known as psoriatic diaper rash. Diaper-area plaques are usually flat, clearly separated, and not scaly.

Many babies with psoriasis have symptoms on their buttocks, which may be confused with diaper rash. (Branisteanu et al./CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Scalp psoriasis is also common in babies. Thick, scaly plaques on the scalp can be confused with cradle cap.

Scalp psoriasis in babies may be mistaken for cradle cap. Cradle cap usually clears on its own. (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 NZ/DermNet)

Psoriasis plaques can change in size and location on a baby’s skin as they grow. Other symptoms of psoriasis in babies include:

  • Pain
  • Itching
  • Stinging
  • Burning
  • Skin tightening
  • Silvery or gray scales

Although symptoms of psoriasis in babies are similar to those in older children and adults, they are more difficult to identify. Babies generally are unable to communicate clearly how they feel, which makes it difficult to know if they have painful or itchy skin.

3. Diagnosing Psoriasis in Babies Can Be Difficult

Only a qualified health care provider can diagnose psoriasis. Psoriasis in infants can look like other skin conditions such as diaper rash, cradle cap, or a yeast infection. A pediatrician will often first treat a baby for these other conditions. If skin lesions don’t clear after the initial treatment, a pediatric dermatologist can help diagnose and treat psoriasis.

Babies may also have a mix of eczema spots and psoriasis plaques, which can make diagnosis difficult. Skin biopsies can help diagnose psoriasis in older children and adults. However, biopsies are not usually performed on babies. Fortunately, many eczema treatments are similar to psoriasis treatments, so differentiating between the two may not be necessary until the child is older.

4. Not All Psoriasis Treatments Are Appropriate for Babies

There is currently no cure for psoriasis in babies. Members of MyPsoriasisTeam have shared how difficult it is to see their little ones experience symptoms: “It’s one thing to have it yourself, but to watch your child go through pain is so hard.”

Fortunately, several effective treatments may help relieve psoriasis symptoms.

Treatments for psoriasis in babies and young children include:

  • Identifying and avoiding triggers that cause flare-ups
  • Maintaining a proper skin care routine, including lotions and moisturizers
  • Using medications

Fewer psoriasis medications can be used in children who are younger than 2 than in older children. Topical medications (applied directly to the skin) are generally safest in babies. Other medications, including systemic medications taken orally or injected into the body, are rarely used in babies. These medications can have severe side effects and are generally only used if safer medicines don’t work well.

Medications for children with psoriasis include topical medications (that are considered first-line treatments), such as:

  • Vitamin D analogs
  • Corticosteroids
  • Calcineurin inhibitors
  • Phototherapy using narrow-band ultraviolet B light

Coal tar is a common topical psoriasis treatment, but experts do not recommend it for use in infants unless your doctor advises it.

More rarely, a doctor may prescribe systemic treatments with retinoids or immunosuppressant drugs, or biologic agents that target inflammation.

Special considerations are needed when treating psoriasis in babies. Many treatments have not been tested in very young children. Your child’s pediatrician or dermatologist can help you understand the benefits and risks of the available options. As one MyPsoriasisTeam member said, “I have a son who has been plagued with psoriasis since birth and am always looking for newer and better treatments.”

Another member shared, “My son has suffered from psoriasis since he was 5 weeks old, and after several medications, he’s on Humira. He’s 5 years old now and doing great. I just have to figure out what antibiotics he can have, as he flared up severely when sick.”

Care from a pediatric dermatologist can help parents develop a plan for managing their baby’s psoriasis.

Talk With Others Who Understand

MyPsoriasisTeam is the social network for people of all ages with psoriasis and their loved ones. On MyPsoriasisTeam, more than 125,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with psoriasis.

Do you have a baby with psoriasis? Which creams, ointments, or other topical treatments are most helpful? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on your Activities page.

Updated on February 9, 2024
All updates must be accompanied by text or a picture.

Become a Subscriber

Get the latest articles about psoriasis sent to your inbox.

Florentina Negoi, M.D. attended the Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Bucharest, Romania, and is currently enrolled in a rheumatology training program at St. Mary Clinical Hospital. Learn more about her here
Candace Crowley, Ph.D. received her doctorate in immunology from the University of California, Davis, where her thesis focused on immune modulation in childhood asthma. Learn more about her here

Related Articles

Scientists have found environmental factors and triggers — such as smoking, specific infections, ...

Is Psoriasis Genetic? A Deeper Look at Genes and Passing It On

Scientists have found environmental factors and triggers — such as smoking, specific infections, ...
Psoriasis isn’t contagious — it doesn’t spread from one person to another — but on your own body?...

Can Psoriasis Spread? 5 Facts To Know

Psoriasis isn’t contagious — it doesn’t spread from one person to another — but on your own body?...
If you are living with psoriasis, you may wonder why you developed the skin condition. Psoriasis ...

5 Psoriasis Risk Factors: Smoking, Genetics, and More

If you are living with psoriasis, you may wonder why you developed the skin condition. Psoriasis ...
Psoriasis is a chronic condition that causes inflammation and the accelerated production of skin ...

10 Facts About Psoriasis You Should Know

Psoriasis is a chronic condition that causes inflammation and the accelerated production of skin ...
Check out our visual guide and learn all about the 6 types of psoriasis and their body locations ...

Types of Psoriasis: Pictures, Symptoms, and More

Check out our visual guide and learn all about the 6 types of psoriasis and their body locations ...
Psoriasis is a chronic (ongoing), immune-mediated skin disease with no cure at this time. However...

Can You Ever Get Rid of Psoriasis? 4 Facts About Remission

Psoriasis is a chronic (ongoing), immune-mediated skin disease with no cure at this time. However...

Recent Articles

Dipping your toes into an oatmeal bath may bring back childhood memories of itchy chickenpox or p...

Oatmeal Bath for Psoriasis: Can It Help or Hurt?

Dipping your toes into an oatmeal bath may bring back childhood memories of itchy chickenpox or p...
When it comes to psoriasis, some people are so eager to find relief that they’re open to trying j...

Coconut Oil for Psoriasis: Is It Effective?

When it comes to psoriasis, some people are so eager to find relief that they’re open to trying j...
About 49 percent of people with plaque psoriasis (the most common form of the skin condition) on ...

Best Makeup for Psoriasis and 3 Tips for Application

About 49 percent of people with plaque psoriasis (the most common form of the skin condition) on ...
Learn what soaps dermatologists recommend for psoriatic skin, and how they can avoid worsening ex...

Soap for Psoriasis: What Do Dermatologists Recommend?

Learn what soaps dermatologists recommend for psoriatic skin, and how they can avoid worsening ex...
“Hormone imbalances cause my psoriasis to flare up,” wrote one MyPsoriasisTeam member. Another sa...

Psoriasis and Hormones: How Hormonal Changes Can Affect You

“Hormone imbalances cause my psoriasis to flare up,” wrote one MyPsoriasisTeam member. Another sa...
There are more treatment options for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) now than ever. But before each new...

8 Facts To Know About Psoriatic Arthritis Clinical Trials

There are more treatment options for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) now than ever. But before each new...
MyPsoriasisTeam My psoriasis Team

Thank you for subscribing!

Become a member to get even more:

sign up for free

close