Psoriasis on the Eyelid: Symptoms and 5 Treatment Tips | MyPsoriasisTeam

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Psoriasis on the Eyelid: Symptoms and 5 Treatment Tips

Medically reviewed by Diane M. Horowitz, M.D.
Written by Joan Grossman
Updated on July 14, 2023

  • About 10 percent of people with psoriasis have symptoms on their eyelids.
  • Psoriasis on the eyelid can be treated, but you must take caution to avoid irritation and side effects that can impact your eyes.
  • Before trying any treatment for psoriasis on the eyelids, talk to your doctor to make sure it’s safe.

Psoriasis on the eyelid is a type of facial psoriasis that is usually caused by sebopsoriasis. Facial psoriasis is often associated with other types of psoriasis that also affect various areas of the body. These include:

    Psoriasis is an immune system disorder that causes the overproduction of skin cells and can occur anywhere on the body. Psoriasis affecting the eyelids or eyes is considered rare. Approximately 10 percent of people with psoriasis have involvement with their eyelids. Other conditions associated with psoriasis can cause eyelid irritation and may resemble psoriasis.

    MyPsoriasisTeam members frequently discuss their experiences with psoriasis on the eyelid, which can be distressing. “My facial psoriasis is playing up today. Itchy eyelids are no fun,” a member said.

    “I have developed a plaque on my eyelid!” another member wrote. “I had really hoped my face would not be affected.”

    Symptoms of Psoriasis on the Eyelid

    Different types of psoriasis can cause itchiness, pain, and inflammation on the eyelid. Any of these symptoms can cause a great deal of discomfort and should be discussed with your health care team.

    Psoriasis can cause dry, discolored skin around the eye. (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 NZ/DermNet)
    Psoriasis can cause cracks and tears in the skin around the eye and tear duct. (Adobe Stock)

    One MyPsoriasisTeam member described struggles with psoriasis on the eyelid. “My eyelid and under-eye area are affected particularly,” they said. “My eyelids are sore, and under my eye is very raw! This tends to happen with sudden change in temperature and lasts for around two months.”

    Another member wrote, “I have it on my eyelid. It really hurts.”

    Some of the specific symptoms associated with psoriasis on the eyelid may depend on the type of psoriasis.

    Plaque Psoriasis

    Some cases involving the eyelid are due to plaque psoriasis, the most common form of psoriasis. It causes thickened, red, purple, or dark brown areas of skin with silvery scales. Plaque psoriasis can occur anywhere on the body, including the eyelid. Plaques on the eyelid can be itchy or painful and may have flaking scales.

    Inverse Psoriasis

    With inverse psoriasis, inflammation occurs in areas where skin touches skin, due to friction in skin folds. Inverse psoriasis is characterized by smooth, red or dark purple patches of inflamed skin. It can occur on the upper eyelid.

    Sebopsoriasis

    Sebopsoriasis is linked to psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis (a type of eczema). It usually affects oily areas of the scalp, nose, eyebrows, and eyelids. Sebopsoriasis causes itchy, discolored, scaly, or crusty skin.

    Blepharitis

    Blepharitis is a type of eyelid inflammation associated with psoriasis. Symptoms include itching and burning on the eyelid. The skin on the eyelid can become red, irritated, and swollen, producing flakes in the eyelashes. Blepharitis usually occurs in both eyes and mostly affects the edges of the eyelids.

    5 Treatment Tips for Eyelid Psoriasis

    The eyelid is a delicate area to treat, and many MyPsoriasisTeam members have questions about what to do when psoriasis appears there. “I’m now getting lesions on my eyelids, right into the deep corners of both eyes, and also affecting the tear ducts,” a member said. “All of my usual creams and ointments are dangerous to use there, and moisturizers burn and inflame. Any ideas?”

    Here are some tips to help ensure you protect your eyes when treating psoriasis on the eyelid.

    1. Report Any Irritation From Treatments to Your Doctor

    Eyelids affected by psoriasis should be treated carefully to avoid irritating the eyes. Eyelid skin is also delicate and sensitive. Some treatments typically used for psoriasis may help reduce inflammation in the eyelid. These include over-the-counter and prescription nonsteroidal and steroidal topical treatments.

    However, you may find steroid creams cause irritation when used around the eyes. In that case, your doctor may prescribe calcineurin inhibitors, which are creams that gently reduce plaque buildup on thin skin like the eyelids. Before starting any treatment for the skin around the eyes, consult with your health care provider.

    2. Consider Systemic Treatments To Improve Eyelid Psoriasis

    Systemic medications like methotrexate, biologics, and other disease-modifying drugs are used to treat autoimmune diseases like psoriasis. They may also help reduce psoriasis on the eyelid. Talk to your doctor about whether systemic treatments may be helpful for you.

    3. Be Aware of the Risk of Side Effects

    Some moisturizers, ointments, creams, and other topical treatments may not be appropriate for the eyelid, due to the risk of side effects that may affect your eyes. One MyPsoriasisTeam member described their frustration with topicals. “Worst spot ever: eyelids!” they wrote. “Topicals near my eyes make them heavy and tired the next day.”

    Sometimes, mild forms of corticosteroid topicals are prescribed for the eyelid. However, steroids may increase the risk for glaucoma and cataracts. Seek medical advice before using anything near your eyes. Be sure to discuss potential risks and side effects from topical steroids with your doctor.

    Discuss phototherapy, or light therapy, with your doctors to be sure it can be used safely for your eyelid without protective goggles.

    4. Have Regular Eye Exams by an Ophthalmologist

    Psoriasis around the eyes and on the eyelids should be checked by your dermatologist and ophthalmologist. Psoriasis on the eyelid can affect the eyes. This condition is known as ocular psoriasis, in which the cornea and conjunctiva are affected, as well as the eyelid.

    People with ocular psoriasis also have an increased risk for ocular surface disease, which includes conditions like conjunctivitis and corneal dryness. People with psoriasis should have yearly exams with an ophthalmologist to check for eye disorders associated with psoriasis. This includes uveitis, a rare and serious type of eye inflammation associated with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    5. Learn From MyPsoriasisTeam Members

    MyPsoriasisTeam members often share their tips for managing psoriasis on the eyelid, which you can discuss with your doctor.

    One member wrote, “I am applying Aquaphor in the morning and right before bed.”

    Other members have suggested treatments including coconut oil, cold-pressed castor oil, and A+D Original Ointment for their eyelid psoriasis. Another member shared their tip: “Johnson’s Baby Shampoo. It’s the only soap product I will use on my eyelids. It seems to help.”

    Other members look beyond over-the-counter products for relief. “Try betamethasone cream 0.05 percent, available by prescription,” a member wrote. “I use it for sensitive areas, like around my eyes.”

    Talk With Others Who Understand

    MyPsoriasisTeam is the social network for people with psoriasis and their loved ones. On MyPsoriasisTeam, more than 118,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with psoriasis.

    Are you living with psoriasis on the eyelid? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on your Activities page.

      Updated on July 14, 2023
      All updates must be accompanied by text or a picture.

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      Diane M. Horowitz, M.D. is an internal medicine and rheumatology specialist. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about her here
      Joan Grossman is a freelance writer, filmmaker, and consultant based in Brooklyn, NY. Learn more about her here

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